Cool Attracting Customers To Your Business images

A few nice attracting customers to your business images I found:

tagged e-mail. [WAS cleanliness is next to godliness…. ]
attracting customers to your business
but it still costs money! [rant on Goodmail]

I am astonished at the knee-jerk, mostly one-sided response to the Goodmail announcement last week. People are acting as if it were evil to ask for money for providing a service. Everyone is free to say no. Goodmail is not stopping any other mail… while, indeed, the proliferation of spam *is* de facto stopping other mail, because at some point recipients start deleting their mail carelessly…

Some points:

First of all, I am not a consultant, investor or any other kind of interested party, though I was prebriefed on this service long ago and I do consider myself a friendly acquaintance of the founders/investors.

Good mail does not charge recipients; it charges senders. It shares some of the revenue with services that deliver the mail and highlight it to their customers. (that is not fundamental to the business model, but it certainly does help early adoption. In the long run, I expect ISPs, companies and other mail agents to deliver Goodmail mail because their customers want to receive it.

What the recipients want, in the end, is the gating factor.

So, the most important point is that Goodmail’s service is not (only) guaranteed delivery. It is guaranteed *worthiness* of delivery. You can’t pay to get your message through, because in the end Goodmail is a certification service. It monitors bounces, spam reports and the like, and dumps senders who rise above a very low level of complaints.

That’s the point of the service. Even though it charges the senders, it is a quality-control service for them. Its investors and managers are thinking long-term and no, they will not sell out the recipients in order to get some short-term revenue for practices that will destroy their long-term business model.

Thus Goodmail is *not* a good vehicle for delivering spam, because it’s not tailored for senders who use dubious opt-in techniques and then claim they were following the law; it’s for senders who actually want to limit the number of people they annoy and who really want (and whose customers really want) their bills, invoices, delivery notices, customer service reports and the like to get through. (I lost my Orbitz account because try as Orbitz might, it could not get my password hint to me through the mail, and the customer service rep would not give it to me over the phone….)

Will Goodmail prevent other mail from getting through? No.

Will it get priority? Yes. (So do FedEx, first-class mail, (formerly) telegrams, and a variety of other means of attracting user attention. They have not destroyed other means of communication.)

The real point is that good behavior – staying clean – costs money. And earning recognition for good behavior also costs money. Some companies monitor their own behavior for themselves…but it’s often hard for outsiders (or inbound mail servers) to know that. Goodmail is one mechanism for passing on that news.

Okay – there’s one other issue. What about, for example, Farber’s IP list? Should Farber have to pay money (in addition to all the labor he donates) to send these messages? The ultimate answer is : he pays for ISP services; he pays for his computer; why shouldn’t he pay to send e-mail? I don’t find the very thought offensive. But in fact, as noted, he has worked hard to develop a good reputation, and he is (presumably) on the white list of most ISPs/inbound mail services. (Meanwhile, Goodmail may offer a special program tailored to nonprofits – though if it does, I’m sure there will be some small, Moldova-based nonprofits that can’t get its attention, and that would be unfair. On the other hand, Goodmail says it *is* likely to charge large nonprofits that regularly make quasi-commercial solicitations, such as the American Red Cross.)

no more space. for the full diatribe, see Where’s Esther [coming soon] or Farber’s list.

“Ultimate Connection Contest”: Power Lunch in the Sky
attracting customers to your business
Yahoo! and Ivanka Trump hosted small business winners from its Ultimate Connection contest with an ultimate power lunch in the sky- at a table suspended above NY Harbor. The company launched the contest to help small business owners better market themselves online to attract new customers. More here: yodel.yahoo.com/2007/07/10/you-chose-the-winners/

“Ultimate Connection Contest”: Power Lunch in the Sky
attracting customers to your business
Yahoo! and Ivanka Trump hosted small business winners from its Ultimate Connection contest with an ultimate power lunch in the sky- at a table suspended above NY Harbor. The company launched the contest to help small business owners better market themselves online to attract new customers. More here: yodel.yahoo.com/2007/07/10/you-chose-the-winners/

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