Colorado Route 82 Climbing Towards Independence Pass Between Leadville and Aspen, Colorado
June 28, 2018 Traffic Increase

Some cool traffic increase images:

Colorado Route 82 Climbing Towards Independence Pass Between Leadville and Aspen, Colorado
traffic increase
State Highway 82 (SH 82) is an 85.3-mile-long (137.3 km) state highway in the U.S. state of Colorado. Its western half provides the principal transportation artery of the Roaring Fork Valley on the Colorado Western Slope, beginning at Interstate 70 (I-70) and U.S. Highway 6 (US 6) Glenwood Springs southeast past Carbondale, Basalt and Aspen. From there it continues up the valley to cross the Continental Divide at Independence Pass. On the Eastern Slope, it follows Lake Creek past some of Colorado’s highest mountains to Twin Lakes Reservoir, where it ends at US 24 south of Leadville.

At 12,095 feet (3,687 m) above sea level, the traverse of Independence Pass is the highest paved crossing of the Continental Divide in North America, and the highest paved through road on Colorado’s state highway network. The pass is closed during the winter months, isolating Aspen from the east and making Highway 82 the only way to reach the popular ski resort town by road. A private foundation has worked with the Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT), which maintains the road, to undo environmental damage to the alpine tundra created when a disused stagecoach route built across the pass during the Colorado Silver Boom of the 1880s became Highway 82 in the early 20th century.

West of Aspen the highway follows the route of an early Colorado Midland Railroad route from the city to Glenwood Springs. Paved during the 1930s, this road has been gradually expanded to four lanes over the course of the 20th and early 21st centuries. The increased traffic resulting from Aspen’s economic rebirth as a resort town has required high-occupancy vehicle lanes, bypasses and the replacement of at least one old bridge. More improvements are planned for both Aspen and Glenwood Springs.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colorado_State_Highway_82

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Text_of_Creative_Commons_…

Colorado Route 82 Climbing Towards Independence Pass Between Leadville and Aspen, Colorado
traffic increase
State Highway 82 (SH 82) is an 85.3-mile-long (137.3 km) state highway in the U.S. state of Colorado. Its western half provides the principal transportation artery of the Roaring Fork Valley on the Colorado Western Slope, beginning at Interstate 70 (I-70) and U.S. Highway 6 (US 6) Glenwood Springs southeast past Carbondale, Basalt and Aspen. From there it continues up the valley to cross the Continental Divide at Independence Pass. On the Eastern Slope, it follows Lake Creek past some of Colorado’s highest mountains to Twin Lakes Reservoir, where it ends at US 24 south of Leadville.

At 12,095 feet (3,687 m) above sea level, the traverse of Independence Pass is the highest paved crossing of the Continental Divide in North America, and the highest paved through road on Colorado’s state highway network. The pass is closed during the winter months, isolating Aspen from the east and making Highway 82 the only way to reach the popular ski resort town by road. A private foundation has worked with the Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT), which maintains the road, to undo environmental damage to the alpine tundra created when a disused stagecoach route built across the pass during the Colorado Silver Boom of the 1880s became Highway 82 in the early 20th century.

West of Aspen the highway follows the route of an early Colorado Midland Railroad route from the city to Glenwood Springs. Paved during the 1930s, this road has been gradually expanded to four lanes over the course of the 20th and early 21st centuries. The increased traffic resulting from Aspen’s economic rebirth as a resort town has required high-occupancy vehicle lanes, bypasses and the replacement of at least one old bridge. More improvements are planned for both Aspen and Glenwood Springs.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colorado_State_Highway_82

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Text_of_Creative_Commons_…

Champlain Locks at Confluence of Champlain Canal with Hudson River, Fort Edward, New York
traffic increase
The Champlain Canal is a 60-mile (97 km) canal that connects the south end of Lake Champlain to the Hudson River in New York. It was simultaneously constructed with the Erie Canal and is now part of the New York State Canal System and the Lakes to Locks Passage.

The canal was proposed in 1812 and construction authorized in 1817. By 1818, 12 miles (19 km) were completed, and in 1819 the canal was opened from Fort Edward to Lake Champlain. The canal was officially opened on September 10, 1823. It was an immediate financial success, and carried substantial commercial traffic until the 1970s.

Today, the enlarged barge canal provides a convenient route from the Atlantic Ocean and Hudson River to Lake Champlain for recreational boaters. The canal begins about 3 miles (4.8 km) north of the locks at the Troy Federal Dam, at the point where the Erie Canal splits from the Hudson River. The Champlain Canal follows the Hudson River north for approximately 35 miles (56 km), with six locks providing navigation around dams on the Hudson River, until it reaches lock C-7 in Fort Edward, New York. At this point, the canal follows a constructed channel for approximately 25 miles (40 km), with five additional locks, bringing the canal to the southern end of Lake Champlain at Whitehall, New York.

The elevation on the Hudson River portion increases from 15 feet (4.6 m) above sea level at the southern end, on the northern end of the locks at the Troy Federal Dam, to about 130 feet (40 m) above sea level at lock C-7, where the canal leaves the Hudson River. The elevation of the constructed portion reaches a peak of 140 feet (43 m) above sea level between locks C-9 and C-11, then declines to the level of Lake Champlain, between 94 and 100 feet (29 and 30 m) above sea level, at Whitehall. By traveling the length of Lake Champlain, boaters can access the Chambly Canal, which connects Lake Champlain to the Saint Lawrence Seaway.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Champlain_Canal

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Text_of_Creative_Commons_…

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