Gwaii Haanas National Park, Queen Charlotte Islands, British Columbia
May 24, 2018 Free Marketing

A few nice free marketing images I found:

Gwaii Haanas National Park, Queen Charlotte Islands, British Columbia
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Taken during a short walk following a dried river bed into the rain forest in beautiful Gwaii Haanas National Park Reserve and Haida Heritage Site.

I like the immersive nature of the photo. See John Brownlow’s note www.flickr.com/photos/pmorgan/85113060/. The term ‘Immersive Landscape’ came via John. The slightly quirky photos at www.flickr.com/groups/contemporary-landscape/ and the substantial but intermittent mailing list tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/contemporarylandscape/ are also interesting.

James Cook and Vancouver Island – Narrative
(This is a worthy part of the answer, but I am also looking for a lost to my mind description of Cook’s encounters with the free-spirited and uninhibited locals.)
"The celebrated navigator James Cook sighted the coast at Vancouver Island in March 1778 and dropped anchor at a place he thought the inhabitants called Nootka. He heard wrong, in fact, since no local language contained this particular word. Even so, the place where Cook anchored continues to be called Nootka Sound, and its inhabitants, the Nuu-chal-nuth, became widely known as the Nootka.

"Cook stayed nearly a month, charting the waters and making friends. On first impression he thought Nuu-chal-nuth people "mild and inoffensive"-until their trading savvy revealed itself. "These people got a greater medley and variety of things from us than any other," he noted. By the time Cook set sail, his ship had been stripped of virtually all surplus metal: copper kettles, tin tea canisters, brass candlesticks and bureau fittings, even the buttons off officers’ uniforms. In return, Cook filled his hold with native artifacts-and a fortune in sea otter pelts.

"The success of Cook’s voyage ignited a worldwide frinzy of excitement. Ships from England, Spain, Portugal, France, and the soon-to-be-independent United States swarmed into the region. Profits were unbelievably high. One trader from New England arrived in 1785 and swapped some cheap metal items for 560 pelts, which commanded ,000 in the China market….American ships alone gathered some 350,000 sea otter pelts altogether, for which native suppliers received an estimated million worth of trade goods.

"In the end there was plenty for everyone, native and foreigner alike. Among the Haida, prominent families were amassing fortunes in coppers, blankets, firearms, and other valuable items. Down the coast it was the same. White traders coming into the region often preferred to deal with one or two powerful families, who became exceptionally wealthy as a result."

Lastly, this book seems interesting: Empire, Barbarism, and Civilisation: Captain Cook, William Hodges and the Return to the Pacific, by Harriet Guest
Key Phrases: frivolous utility, colonial romance, progressive civilisation (from Amazon)

"The artist William Hodges accompanied Captain Cook on his second voyage to the South Pacific in 1772-5. His extraordinarily vivid images, read against the fascinating journals of Cook and his companions, reveal as much about European cultures and historiography as about the peoples they visited. In this lively and original book, Harriet Guest discusses Hodges’s dramatic landscapes and portraits alongside written accounts of te voyages and in the context of the theories of civilisation which shaped European perceptions – theories drawn from the works of philosophers of the Scottish enlightenment such as Adam Smith and John Millar. She argues that the voyagers resorted to diverse or incompatible models of progress in successive encounters with different groups of islanders, and shows how these models also structured metropolitan views of the voyagers and of Hodges’s work. This fully illustrated study offers a fresh perspective on eighteenth-century representations of gender, colonialism and exploration."

(all of the above added 14 Feb 2009, slightly edited 11 Nov 2013)

Afterthought about tracking edits: I felt it good practise to note when I updated the description, in interests of rigour and completeness, but now I wonder if that just gets in the way of progress?

Free Market Bathroom
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Looking up from a urinal at Panera Bread, I got a quick chuckle from seeing the freebie ad air fresheners of two competing uniform service companies. Now that is capitalism at work.

Free Entertainment
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Saturday at the Flea Market

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