Nice How To Get More Visitors To Your Website photos

A few nice how to get more visitors to your website images I found:

Vietnam Memorial, Aug 2009 – 30
how to get more visitors to your website
Note: this photo was published as an illustration in an Aug 2009 Squidoo blog titled "Timing my Life in Songs." It was also posted as an illustration in a Vietnam Veteran’s Memorial website. And it was published in a Nov 13, 2009 blog titled "Çocuklarda ve Gençlerde Bel Ağrısı." It was also published in a May 28, 2010 blog titled "Take a Moment to Reflect This Memorial Day."

Moving into 2015, the photo was published in an Apr 13, 2015 blog titled "The Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C."

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The Vietnam Memorial opened to the public on November 11, 1982. I visited not too long after that, though I don’t remember exactly when. All I remember was that it was a dark, cold, drizzly Saturday afternoon, and that it was very, very sad.

God knows how many times I’ve been back to Washington since then, but some 25 years after my initial visit, I thought I should come back and see it again … when the weather was likely to be better, and when I would likely see a different generation of visitors.

I made two separate visits, and got two different impressions. My second visit was just before dawn, at 5:45 AM. There was a crescent moon, and one star, in the pink-and-purple sky; but there were no people at all. Though the memorial is simply a chronological list of names, one can imagine that the 58,261 dead are sleeping in peace as the night fades away and the sun returns to warm the granite stone once again. I took a few pictures of this early scene; you can decide for yourself if it’s peaceful or sad.

My first visit was just before sunset, on a Sunday evening. I heard one of the park guides telling her flock that the summer crowds had been smaller this year than in the past, but there were still plenty of people along the length of the wall. What interested me most about the visitors was their age: I saw a few people who looked old enough to have been adults back in the Vietnam era, though I saw no one in uniform, and no one who looked like he or she had actually been there.

But there were far more people of a younger generation: people in their 30s or 40s, whose father or mother or uncle or aunt might have served in that war. Not surprisingly, I saw people carefully searching out specific names, and resting their finger or hand for long moments on a single name, as if they might somehow be able to communicate with a dead relative after all these years.

And then there were the children — some as young as one or two, but most looked to be 8 or 10 or 12. They may have been the grandchildren of some fallen soldier, or they may have been entirely unrelated to those 58,261 individuals. But one way or another, you could see that the Wall made an impact on them: they were quiet and reverent, respectful of what they could barely grasp, as the list of names surrounded them and stretched as far as they could see, to the left and to the right.

Indeed, the very idea of creating a monument that consists of nothing but a long inclined wall containing a list of names is so simple, so … well, almost primitive … that you can’t imagine it would have any impact, at least not on the typical jaded visitor. But it does have an impact, it really does…

If you haven’t seen this memorial, you owe it to yourself to carve out a little time when you next visit Washington. And if, like me, it’s been 10 or 20 or 25 years since you last saw it, I think you need to come see it again.

Vietnam Memorial, Aug 2009 – 29
how to get more visitors to your website
Note: this photo was published as an illustration in an Aug 2009 Squidoo blog titled "Timing my Life in Songs." It was also posted as an illustration in a Vietnam Veteran’s Memorial website

************************
The Vietnam Memorial opened to the public on November 11, 1982. I visited not too long after that, though I don’t remember exactly when. All I remember was that it was a dark, cold, drizzly Saturday afternoon, and that it was very, very sad.

God knows how many times I’ve been back to Washington since then, but some 25 years after my initial visit, I thought I should come back and see it again … when the weather was likely to be better, and when I would likely see a different generation of visitors.

I made two separate visits, and got two different impressions. My second visit was just before dawn, at 5:45 AM. There was a crescent moon, and one star, in the pink-and-purple sky; but there were no people at all. Though the memorial is simply a chronological list of names, one can imagine that the 58,261 dead are sleeping in peace as the night fades away and the sun returns to warm the granite stone once again. I took a few pictures of this early scene; you can decide for yourself if it’s peaceful or sad.

My first visit was just before sunset, on a Sunday evening. I heard one of the park guides telling her flock that the summer crowds had been smaller this year than in the past, but there were still plenty of people along the length of the wall. What interested me most about the visitors was their age: I saw a few people who looked old enough to have been adults back in the Vietnam era, though I saw no one in uniform, and no one who looked like he or she had actually been there.

But there were far more people of a younger generation: people in their 30s or 40s, whose father or mother or uncle or aunt might have served in that war. Not surprisingly, I saw people carefully searching out specific names, and resting their finger or hand for long moments on a single name, as if they might somehow be able to communicate with a dead relative after all these years.

And then there were the children — some as young as one or two, but most looked to be 8 or 10 or 12. They may have been the grandchildren of some fallen soldier, or they may have been entirely unrelated to those 58,261 individuals. But one way or another, you could see that the Wall made an impact on them: they were quiet and reverent, respectful of what they could barely grasp, as the list of names surrounded them and stretched as far as they could see, to the left and to the right.

Indeed, the very idea of creating a monument that consists of nothing but a long inclined wall containing a list of names is so simple, so … well, almost primitive … that you can’t imagine it would have any impact, at least not on the typical jaded visitor. But it does have an impact, it really does…

If you haven’t seen this memorial, you owe it to yourself to carve out a little time when you next visit Washington. And if, like me, it’s been 10 or 20 or 25 years since you last saw it, I think you need to come see it again.

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